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Narcissus 'Daffodils Tete Tete' ( 4")

Bulbs
Bulbs

Common Name: miscellaneous daffodil
Type: Bulb
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Zone: 4 to 8
Height: 0.50 to 0.75 feet
Spread: 0.25 to 0.50 feet
Bloom Time: April
Bloom Description: Buttercup yellow
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Flower: Showy, Good Cut
Tolerate: Rabbit, Deer, Drought

Culture

Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Good soil drainage is essential. Best in organically rich loams. Soils should be kept uniformly moist during the growing season. Plant bulbs in early to mid fall. Planting depth depends upon bulb size. In St. Louis, each bulb should be planted 2 to 3 times as deep as the bulb, with at least 3” of soil over the top. Space bulbs from 4-10” apart (larger bulbs are planted further apart than smaller ones). Larger spacing may look sparse in early years, but the spaces will fill in over time and division will be needed less. In general, most bulbs will be planted 3-6" deep and 4-8” apart. After the flowers have bloomed in spring, the top portion of each flower stem may be removed, as practicable, to prevent seed formation, but foliage should not be cut back until it begins to yellow. Flowers usually face the sun, so bulbs should be grown with any shade areas at the rear of the planting. Bulbs can be left undisturbed for a number of years. If bloom quality and quantity decline over time, clumps may be divided by digging just after the foliage dies back.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Narcissus is a genus of about 50 species of bulbous perennials from Europe and North Africa. They are a mainstay of the spring garden. Depending upon species or hybrid type, flowers appear singly or in clusters atop stems rising from 6-30” tall. Flowers generally feature a trumpet or cup (the corona) surrounded by six petals (perianth segments), in colors ranging from white to yellow to orange to pink to bicolors. Flowers are sometimes fragrant. Flowers bloom in early spring. Narrow, linear to strap-shaped, green leaves appear in erect to sprawling clumps. Narcissus has been organized into 13 divisions. See Narcissus (group) for more details.

Genus name honors a beautiful youth who became so entranced with his own reflection that he pined away and the gods turned him into this flower.

'Tete-a-Tete' is classified as a miscellaneous daffodil (Division XII). This very early blooming, miniature daffodil rises only to 6-8" tall and features 1-3 buttercup-yellow flowers with long, narrow trumpets and slightly reflexed petals per stem. Bulbs are easily grown, multiply rapidly and can be left undisturbed for a number of years.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. With proper soil and culture, daffodils are noted for being almost pest-free. Bulb rot may occur in poorly-drained soils. Infrequent insect pests include narcissus bulb fly, narcissus nematode, slugs and snails. Bulb scale mite may occur. Narcissus yellow stripe virus is an infrequent problem.

Garden Uses

This miniature daffodil may be massed or grown in intimate groupings in rock gardens, in border fronts, near shrubs or trees, in wild gardens or in naturalized areas. A popular cultivar for containers, window boxes and indoor forcing.


Narcissus 'Daffodils Large Yellow' (6")

Bulbs
Bulbs

Same information as Narcissus 'Daffodils Tete Tete' ( 4")


 Narcissus 'Daffodils Accent' (6")

Bulbs
Bulbs

Common Name: large-cupped daffodil
Type: Bulb
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Zone: 3 to 8
Height: 1.00 to 1.50 feet
Spread: 0.50 to 1.00 feet
Bloom Time: April
Bloom Description: White petals and pink cup
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Flower: Showy
Tolerate: Rabbit, Deer, Drought

Culture

Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Good soil drainage is essential. Best in organically rich loams. Soils should be kept uniformly moist during the growing season. Plant bulbs in early to mid fall. Planting depth depends upon bulb size. In St. Louis, each bulb should be planted 2 to 3 times as deep as the bulb, with at least 3” of soil over the top. Space bulbs from 4-10” apart (larger bulbs are planted further apart than smaller ones). Larger spacing may look sparse in early years, but the spaces will fill in over time and division will be needed less. In general, most bulbs will be planted 3-6" deep and 4-8” apart. After the flowers have bloomed in spring, the top portion of each flower stem may be removed, as practicable, to prevent seed formation, but foliage should not be cut back until it begins to yellow. Flowers usually face the sun, so bulbs should be grown with any shade areas at the rear of the planting. Bulbs can be left undisturbed for a number of years. If bloom quality and quantity decline over time, clumps may be divided by digging just after the foliage dies back.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Narcissus is a genus of about 50 species of bulbous perennials from Europe and North Africa. They are a mainstay of the spring garden. Depending upon species or hybrid type, flowers appear singly or in clusters atop stems rising from 6-30” tall. Flowers generally feature a trumpet or cup (the corona) surrounded by six petals (perianth segments), in colors ranging from white to yellow to orange to pink to bicolors. Flowers are sometimes fragrant. Flowers bloom in early spring. Narrow, linear to strap-shaped, green leaves appear in erect to sprawling clumps. Narcissus has been organized into 13 divisions. See Narcissus (group) for more details.

Genus name honors a beautiful youth who became so entranced with his own reflection that he pined away and the gods turned him into this flower.

'Chromacolor' is a large-cupped daffodil (Division II). Large-cupped daffodils are perhaps the most popular of the twelve daffodil divisions. By definition, a large-cup daffodil features a cup (corona) that is more than 1/3 but less than the length of the petals (perianth segments). One flower per stem. ‘Chromacolor’ rises 16-18” tall in spring. Each flower features white petals and a deep pink cup. Blooms mid-season (April in St. Louis). Narrow, strap-shaped, green leaves in clumps. Pollen parent is N. ‘Accent’ and seed parent is N. ‘Carita’. W. G. Pannill, 1976.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. With proper soil and culture, daffodils are noted for being almost pest-free. Bulb rot may occur in poorly-drained soils. Infrequent insect pests include narcissus bulb fly, narcissus nematode, slugs and snails. Bulb scale mite may occur. Narcissus yellow stripe virus is an infrequent problem.

Garden Uses

Unlike tulips, daffodils keep blooming year after year. They are best sited in beds, borders, wild gardens, open woodland areas, in front of shrubs or massed under trees. They are best planted in quantity, i.e., from smaller groupings of at least 6 bulbs to large sweeping drifts. They mix well with other spring-flowering bulbs.


Hyacinthus orientalis 'Common Hyacinthus' (1 bloom, 3 bloom, 5 bloom)

 

Bulbs
Bulbs

Common Name: common hyacinth
Type: Bulb
Family: Asparagaceae
Native Range: Central and southern Turkey, northwestern Syria, Lebanon
Zone: 4 to 8
Height: 0.50 to 1.00 feet
Spread: 0.25 to 0.50 feet
Bloom Time: April
Bloom Description: Blue, purple, pink, red, and white
Sun: Full sun
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Flower: Showy, Fragrant
Tolerate: Rabbit, Black Walnut

Culture

Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun. Prefers organically rich soils. Tolerates some light shade. Plant bulbs 4-6” deep and 4-6” apart in mid fall. Best planted in mass or in clusters (e.g., 6-15 bulbs). Soils should be kept moist (particularly if soils are dry) immediately after planting to encourage root growth. Also keep soils moist during the spring growing season, but taper off moisture after bloom as bulbs head toward dormancy. Promptly remove spent flower spikes so plants do not need to expend energy on seed production. Bulbs are commonly grown in containers, especially when forced for indoor winter bloom.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Hyacinthus orientalis, commonly called hyacinth, Dutch hyacinth or garden hyacinth, is a spring flowering bulb that produces spikes of flowers noted for their intense, often overpowering, fragrance. Typically grows 6-10” tall. Each bulb sends up 3-4 strap-shaped green leaves in early spring and a stiff densely flowered spike of extremely fragrant tubular flowers. A very large number of hybrid cultivars are available in commerce under this species name in flower colors including various shades of blue, purple, pink, red and white.

Genus name of a god associated with the rebirth of vegetation like Adonis.

Specific epithet means from the Orient.

NOTE: Images displayed on this page are of hybrid cultivars not the species.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. Bulb rot may occur in poorly drained soils. Wear gloves when planting bulbs to avoid possible allergic skin reactions. Flowering often decreases in quality after the first year, and bulbs may need to be replaced every couple of years.

Garden Uses

Group or mass in beds, borders, rock gardens, along walks. Effectively mixes with other spring flowering bulbs. Containers. Force bulbs for indoor winter flowers.


 Tulipa (group) 'Tulips' (3 bloom, 5-6 bloom, 7-8 bloom 10 bloom)

Bulbs
Bulbs

Common Name: tulip
Type: Bulb
Family: Liliaceae
Zone: 3 to 8
Height: 0.75 to 2.00 feet
Spread: 0.50 to 0.75 feet
Bloom Time: April to May
Bloom Description: All colors but true blue
Sun: Full sun
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Flower: Showy, Good Cut
Tolerate: Black Walnut

Culture

Grow in organically rich, fertile, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun. Best with cool, moist winters and warm dry summers. Plant bulbs 4-6” deep (three times the depth of the bulb) in fall. In heavy clay soils, a slightly shallower depth is best. Space bulbs 2-5” apart depending on plant size. Tulips may be grown as perennials or as annuals. Species tulips often perform better than hybrid plants as perennials. When growing tulips as perennials, promptly remove spent flower stems after bloom (prevents seeding), but do not remove foliage until it yellows. In most cases, tulip performance declines substantially starting with the second year. Many growers prefer growing tulips, particularly hybrids, as annuals.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Tulips are popular spring flowers that come in nearly all colors except true blue. Shape is often a cup with a teardrop form. Bowl, goblet and star shapes also exist. Some flowers are double. Each flower has six petal-like tepals. Tepals may be fringed or ruffled. Basal leaves are blue/gray-green in color with a broad oval shape, but some varieties have strap-shaped or long narrow leaves. Tulips are generally organized into 15 divisions based upon flower shape and origin. Bloom time varies.

Single Early Group (Division 1). Single, cup-shaped, early to mid-spring tulips on stems to 10-14” tall.

Double Early Group (Division 2). Double, peonylike, mid-spring tulips on stems to 12-16” tall.

Triumph Group (Division 3). Single, cup-shaped, mid to late-spring tulips on stems to 16-24” tall. Crosses between single early, Darwin and cottage types.

Darwin Hybrid Group (Division 4). Large mid to late spring tulips on stems to 20-28” tall. Some have contrasting eyes or penciling.

Single Late Group (Division 5). Single, cup/goblet-shaped, late spring (May) tulips on stems to 18-30” tall. Includes Darwin and cottage tulips. Some cultivars have more than one bloom per stem.

Lily-flowered Group (Division 6). Single, lilylike, goblet-shaped, mid to late spring tulips with pointed reflexed tepals on stems to 18-26” tall.

Fringed Group (Division 7). Single, cup-shaped, mid to late spring tulips with fringed tepals on stems to 14-26” tall. Fringe may be in a different color.

Viridiflora Group (Division 8). Single, cup/rounded/bowl shaped, late spring flowers (May flowers) streaked with green on stems to 15-20” tall.

Rembrandt Group (Division 9). Single cup-shaped tulips striped with various colors. True Rembrandt Tulips are no longer sold in commerce because the striping is caused by a virus.

Parrot Group (Division 10). Single, cup-shaped, late spring tulips with fringed and ruffled tepals on stems to 14-26” tall. Blooms are feathered and striped in a variety of colors.

Double Late Group (Division 11). Double, peony-like, bowl shaped, late spring tulips on stems to 14-24” tall.

Kaufmanniana Group (Division 12). Single or in clusters of 2-5, cup/bowl shaped, early to mid-spring tulips on stems to 6-12” tall. Commonly called waterlily tulips because the small flowers resemble waterlilies.

Fosteriana Group (Division 13). Single, large, bowl-shaped, mid-spring tulips on stems to 8-20” tall. Blooms are sometimes margined or flamed with different colors and have contrasting bases.

Greigii Group (Division 14). Single, bowl-shaped, early to mid spring tulips on stems to 6-12” tall. Some blooms feature several different colors and contrasting bases. Variegated leaves are mottled and streaked with purple.

Miscellaneous Group (Division 15). All species tulips plus hybrids not included in other groups.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems. Bulb and root rots may occur, particularly in wet, poorly drained soils. Gray mold. Mosaic virus may also occur. Animal pests include aphids, slugs and snails. Mice and voles are attracted to the bulbs. Squirrels may dig up newly planted bulbs.

Garden Uses

Tulips come in a wide variety of colors, sizes and flower types. In general, they are best planted in large groups or massed.


Muscari azureum 'Blue Grape Hyacinth' (4")

Bulbs
Bulbs

Common Name: grape hyacinth
Type: Bulb
Family: Asparagaceae
Native Range: Eastern Turkey
Zone: 5 to 8
Height: 0.25 to 0.50 feet
Spread: 0.25 to 0.50 feet
Bloom Time: March to April
Bloom Description: Blue
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Low
Suggested Use: Naturalize
Flower: Showy, Fragrant, Good Cut
Tolerate: Deer, Black Walnut

Culture

Easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Plant bulbs in fall about 2-3” deep and 3-4” apart in fall. Flowers emerge in early spring. Keep ground moist during the spring growing season, but reduce watering after foliage begins to die back (plants go dormant in summer). Propagate by bulb offsets or seed. This species will naturalize by self-seeding.

Noteworthy Characteristics

Muscari azureum, commonly known as grape hyacinth, is native to Eastern Turkey and the Caucasus. Tiny blue flowers (each to 3/16" long) which are densely packed in a conical 20-40 flowered raceme bloom in early spring (March-April) atop a leafless scape rising to 4-6" tall. Flowers are fragrant. Basal, linear, grass-like, gray-green leaves (usually 2-5 leaves per bulb) rise to 6" long in spring, but elongate after flowering to 10-12" long before eventually withering in the heat of the summer as the plant goes dormant. Although flowers in the genus Muscari are typically urn-shaped, the flowers of this species are open bell-shaped (nearly unconstricted mouths reminiscent of hyacinth) as reflected by prior designations of this plant as Hyacinthella azurea, Hyacinthus azureus and Pseudomuscari azureum.

Genus name comes from the Turkish name recorded by Clusius in 1583. Possibly from the Latin word muscus in reference to flower aroma.

Specific epithet from Latin means sky blue in obvious reference to flower color.

Problems

No serious insect or disease problems.

Garden Uses

Provides spectacular drifts of color when massed in open areas, around shrubs, under deciduous trees, in the rock garden or in the border front. Also mixes well with other early blooming bulbs. Popular container plant. Also forces easily for winter bloom.


 

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